Sunday, May 24, 2020

You Will Meet a Stranger - 588 Words

In the beginning, we meet a stranger, wearing buckskin leather and caring a revolver, by the name of Shane. He rides into a valley that hasn’t yet been fully settled, a short time after the Homestead Act was set into play after 1861. This gives us a first look at our professional hero, no matter what his history, hes apparently skilled in all aspects shown in t he movie. Somehow, he is brought into a dispute between the homesteaders and a ruthless cattle baron by the name of Rufus, who wants to force Starrett and the others off the land. Already you have the setting for an intense motion picture. Shane displays some of his bedrock values when he decides to go into town the homesteaders to gather materials at the general store. Shane crosses the threshold of the bar, where Rykers men are, and asks for a â€Å"soda pop†. One of Rykers men starts jeering Shane and throws liquid on him, uttering ..smell like a man! This is the part of the rising action where the hero (Shane) embraces his beliefs and values. Shane orders two drinks. He pours one down the man’s shirt and flings the other in his face trailed by a punch. A bar-fight ensues, and our Shane starts to develop some stereotypes as a hero (i.e. strength, courage, and bravery). He also presents the characteristics of a family man as well as a teacher when a child is drawn to him and the gun. The child wishes that Shane will teach him how to use a pistol. Shane shows him how to wear his holster and demonstrates his speed andShow MoreRelatedHospitality As A Code Of Conduct1074 Words   |  5 Pagesdeeply embedded in ancient Greek culture. Hospitality was very important and seen as a code of conduct. The term used to describe the concept of Ancient Greek hospitality was xenia. Xenia is basically the generosity and courtesy shown to guests, strangers, or those far from home. Xenia consists of two rules. The first rule is from host to guest, in which the host must be hospitable to the guest and provide basic needs (food, drink, and a bath). The host also has to hold all questioning until afterRead More`` Strangers `` By Toni Morrison And James Baldwin1400 Words   |  6 Pages Everyone carries a different opinion of a stranger in his/her mind depending upon th ere past encounters with strangers. This is evident in the works of Toni Morrison and James Baldwin. We encounter too many people everyday and it’s impossible to get to know them all. We observe and gauge them based on appearances, just like we do with â€Å" Books based on their cover † says Edwin Rolfe in â€Å"Murder in the Glass room†. In â€Å"Strangers† by Morrison, she meets a fisherwoman at her neighbor’s seawall. MorrisonRead MoreThesis Paper on Social Networking1552 Words   |  7 Pagesis now with only 8 % of the U.S. population signed on to facebook. Today, more than half of Americans over the age of twelve have a facebook profile. For twelve year olds to have a facebook profile of their own is just unsafe. There are a lot of strangers that they can come across and not even know it. There isn’t an exact number of a certain race because more and more people connect to these social networking sites every day. However, Caucasians are likely to use facebook, Hispanics are most likelyRead MoreInternet Safety : Being Safe On The Web926 Words   |  4 Pagesemails that might contain viruses or inappropriate content. Simply do not open emails from sources you do not know. Better yet delete such emails. †¢ Instant messaging is the exchange of real-time messages from a contact list. In any such interactions limit the amount of personal information you share and with children, make sure their contact list are people you know and discourage them from adding strangers to their contact list. †¢ Chat rooms are hang-out areas online where people interact about commonRead MoreEssay1206 Words   |  5 PagesAdd something to bring you in Will says â€Å" Hello ma can i get a pizza sub please â€Å" Jenny â€Å" yes sir let me wipe that up for you and what may i get you there`` â€Å" ok one pizza sub and one meat lovers for the pizza that will be 10.67 and for the meat lovers it will be 13.79 â€Å" At that moment there was a shattering sound of glass breaking and a large funp as someone for some kind of gas into the subway . Jenny â€Å" whats ha â€Å" thump as all three of thim lade nocked out on the floor in canRead MoreAn Orphan Girl With The Heart Of A Warrior Named Jules1257 Words   |  6 Pagesin town a stranger recognizes Jules and tries to engage in conversation, â€Å"Is that you Jules?† the stranger asked. She tried to avoid any contact with the locals but the stranger insisted again and again. After the stranger was following her thru the town she decides to turn around and pull her shoto sword and placed it under the stranger neck and asked him, â€Å"How do you know my name?†. The stranger replied â€Å"I know your grandmother!†. She pulled her sword from the neck and told the stranger that sheRead MoreMaking Friends Through Internet Essay622 Words   |  3 Pagesfriends on internet are not always reliable, they might tell you a lie or pretend to be someone else. You may trust the person on internet and give out your personal information. The person on the other side of the screen can’t console you, they can only advise you. It would be dangerous if the person want to meet face to face. You will never know what a complete stranger will do to you. He or she might have some special purposes and do harm to you. Many people feel confident and safe behind their screenRead MoreThe Theory Of The Attachment Theory1742 Words   |  7 Pagesexperiment was conducted in a small room with the mother, toys, and a stranger. 100 middle class American families were used, and experimenters observed the behavior of the infant in eight different steps, each lasting about three minutes each. At the beginning of the experiment the mother and infant enter the new room. The caregiver lets the infant explore the new environment and play with toys without intervening. The stranger then enters the room and first interacts with the mother and soon afterRead MoreEssay On How To Meet People1032 Words   |  5 PagesAre you going so you can meet people? Before we talk about this point, I want to specify what I’m talking about. The previous chapter was about going to college for the nightlife sort of parties. When I refer to meeting people in this chapter, it’s in a more general sense. So while you can meet people and make friends in parties, I’ll be going over social life in general on this section. Alright, now that I’ve got that out of the way, let’s start with the obvious. College, at least in the firstRead MoreGeneral Marketing1168 Words   |  5 Pagescomputer arena due to being able to fill all the above mentioned uses, you can personalize your personal computer and purchase this computer at a reasonable price. You can also purchase any and every computer accessory as well and as added value Dell has a great customer service department and a warranty structure to sway the most cautious of buyers. Dell incorporates both marketing goals into their business and that is the very reason you see Dell emblazoned on some piece of tech on almost every desktop

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Media and Disaster Aid Essay - 2988 Words

INTRODUCTION There is little doubt that the media has a profound impact on our awareness of humanitarian emergencies and disaster relief around the world. The reality of these disasters, and our responses to them, are heavily influenced by the framework that the media uses – through exposure on television, radio and in print – to capture our attention. The media has a number of important responsibilities as it reports on the events surrounding a natural disaster. I have broken down the media’s focus into four stages: early warning, immediate response, post-disaster review, and implementation. While these phases do not necessarily occur consecutively without overlap, they form a good basis for explaining the different roles of the media†¦show more content†¦The final stage is the â€Å"implementation† phase. The media’s responsibility here is to bring forward the recommendations from the post-disaster review, and put pressure on the government to change their policies. In this essay, I will examine the roles of the media through each of these phases and determine their success and failures in each. I will also consider the crucial relationship between the media and NGOs, and identify the ways that the media can work more closely with technology to assist NGOs and public organizations in their relief efforts and disaster management plans. EARLY WARNING PHASE During the early warning phase, the media’s responsibility is to alert communities at risk and distribute disaster response advice. Effective warning systems and disaster reduction strategies are still not a natural component of disaster management and risk reduction globally. The World Disasters Report 2009 (Chapter 1) examines the progress and success in efforts to develop early warning systems, and identifies some of the challenges at global, regional and national levels. One problem with effective warning systems is that they are transmitted through multiple channels before being broadcast to the vulnerable population. In the case of a fire alert for example, the warning could pass through the Bureau of Meteorology, fire department headquarters and the local fire authority, before the media receives the information and makes theShow MoreRelatedThe Media, Disasters, and Aid Essay2947 Words   |  12 PagesINTRODUCTION There is little doubt that the media has a profound impact on our awareness of humanitarian emergencies and disaster relief around the world. The reality of these disasters, and our responses to them, are heavily influenced by the framework that the media uses – through exposure on television, radio and in print – to capture our attention. The media has a number of important responsibilities during a natural disaster. I have broken down their responsibilities into four stages: earlyRead MoreEmergency And Disaster Response Of Emergency Management Essay1353 Words   |  6 PagesEMERGENCY AND DISASTER RESPONSE The cycle of emergency management continues with response to an emergency or disaster. The goal in this stage is to bring order to chaos. By alleviating confusion it allows an organized response. (Faggiano McNall, 2012) An organized response to disasters is vital to mitigating the loss of lives and property. To properly respond during a disaster there must be a coordinated response, complete with information sharing and exceptional communication. Communication mustRead MoreFacebook s Impact On Social Media923 Words   |  4 PagesTwitter is rapidly ground online social media network platform that allows user to send short messages â€Å"tweets† and read other user messages. Through this system people are able to receive real time updates, and follow other users in order to stay updated on significant information based on individual preference. The initial â€Å"tweet† was sent on March 21, 2006 by the Web designer Jack Dorsey (Nicholas Carlson, 2011). The Twitter dev eloped from the start-up company Odeo Inc., and first idea was toRead MoreThe Role Of Media And Its Impact On Emergency Management1428 Words   |  6 PagesRole in Disasters The following is a research paper on the role of the media in disasters. This paper will highlight the various types of media and their impact on emergency management today. It will compare and contrast the negative and positive roles the media plays in a disaster. It will then examine the positive and negative roles the media plays in disasters and how this is relevant to emergency management. The concluding section of the paper will highlight the various types of media and theirRead MoreBrain Storm : The New War On Poverty1269 Words   |  6 PagesBrain Storm: The New War on Poverty How the media portrays those living in poverty initiated many new chapters in scholarly research. Very few, however, address the media’s depiction of the poor during times of disaster (natural or manmade). The issue of poverty is mostly understood through the frames in which the media presents it. As the media continues to use episodic frames (individual causes) over thematic frames that seek to address poverty in its entirety (Iyengar, 1990), the frames deliverRead MoreRisk And Politics Of Disaster Coverage1263 Words   |  6 PagesAnalysis of â€Å"Risk and Politics of Disaster Coverage in Haiti and Katrina† Introduction and Purpose of the Study The article, â€Å"Risk and Politics of Disaster Coverage in Haiti and Katrina,† by Jennifer Petersen of the University of Virginia, which appeared in the journal Communication, Culture Critique in 2014, provides a comparison and contrast of the media coverage of Hurricane Katrina (2005), which devastated the U.S. Gulf Coast and was the costliest natural disaster in the nation’s history, andRead MoreThe Destruction from the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami and Responses from the Maldives Government1660 Words   |  7 Pageseven catastrophic for a country like Maldives that never experienced disasters of such scale. While some of the islands in Maldives were completely destroyed and a significant number of lives lost; the damages to economy, infrastructure, environment and human psyche was immeasurable (Pardasani, 2006, p. 80). Having only dealt with storm surges and localized flooding, â€Å"there were no operational plans or capacity to deal with a disaster of this ma gnitude† in Maldives (Government of Maldives, et al., 2005Read MoreActors in the Humanitarian Community683 Words   |  3 Pageshappen during an emergency or in a crisis situation. If one accept that it is by fate a crisis happens and do not have any precautionary measures, then the crisis management is doomed to fail. This holds true when dealing with humanitarian aids after a disaster,whether man-made or of natural cause. It is then of utmost importance that all the actors in the humanitarian community knows their roles and get their acts together harmoniously. Figure 1 shows the link between these different actors and howRead MoreNatural Disaster Essay902 Words   |  4 Pages Natural disaster is one of the major issues that the world is facing now a day. Natural disaster is caused by nature they are difficult to predict when its going to happen, how to handle it  and its impossible to stop it. Weather is one of the major natural disaster that is going around th is year it may include hurricanes, tornadoes and the weather conditions being so cold or so hot. It’s very important to be prepared for these kinds of events when they happen especially in the countriesRead MoreThe Issues With Organizational Communication978 Words   |  4 PagesIssues with Organizational Communication Crises are seen substantially as media events. Therefore media coverage whether they have been natural or man-made; is indicative of how important, essential and even at times, how down right frustrating the media has been and will continue to be before, during and after a crisis. Many people tend to turn to the media and various different media sites (such as Twitter, Facebook, etc.) to gain pertinent information regarding an event that has taken place

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Teachers Being Obliged to Teach Morality Free Essays

Teachers are obliged to develop children’s morality as a part of their education. Children observe and informally learn life skills from an array of sources throughout their lifetime; these influences can affect the physical, cognitive and social-emotional aspects of a child’s development. The standards of a child’s morals are predominantly shaped by the morals of those around them such as peers, adults and teachers; this in many cases can prove undamaging, however some may unintentionally adopt a preconventional morality. We will write a custom essay sample on Teachers Being Obliged to Teach Morality or any similar topic only for you Order Now In order to prevent undesirable moral traits within a child should it be the obligation of their teachers to educate the children in an internal behavioural context? Will this solve the issue? Social theologist’s propose that mental and moral standards have no objective reality, they are derived from ones subjective opinion (Miller, 2007). However it is also argued that a child’s environment is directly linked to changes in the prefrontal cortex of the brain, subsequently affecting the child’s cognitive mental development (Hansen, 2012). It can be justified to say that children can and will be affected morally by their surroundings, conversely the degree of impact will be determined by the child’s internal response. The process of moral advancement is linked to an individual’s three developmental domains, physical, cognitive and social-emotional; all of these domains are interrelated among each other and in some way represented within the educational curriculum (McDevitt, 2004). Physical abilities, neurological capabilities and the acquisition of motor skills are all taught and practiced throughout schooling, the obligation teachers have in assisting physical development manifests into an appropriate platform for moral development within the other two domains. Children begin to conceptualise abstract and analytical thought patterns as they learn and follow their teacher’s rules which differ from their social and home rubrics. According to Piaget (1932) children at their earliest stages of moral development begin to analyse behaviours based on the resulting consequences (McDevitt, 2013). Kohlberg’s theory of moral development, where a child’s moral fortitude is defined by what they believe is emotionally right or wrong (McDevitt, 2013), poses as another form of moral evolution. At school, these two forms of moral development arise from teachers whom are individually obligated to teach their students a broad range of moral behaviours and base their teaching on their own moral values; however this creates room for error and discrimination. The obligations some teachers have to educate students on morals is both self-motivated and an honourable attribute, teachers within the public schooling system however have a fine line they must abide by. Religion, is banned in the public school curriculum by the Board of Studies, many people such as Humanists have the perspective that in order to guide children in establishing ‘proper’ morals one must reference a form of religion, whether it be directly or indirectly, however if it creates a happier, healthier child by all means teach moral education in school (Schafersman, 1991). Liberals see the education of morals and ethics to children not as a means of teaching and developing children socially and emotionally, but as a manifestation of religious views (Miller, 2007). This idea is not unfair, many parents have a range of views they predict superior to the idea of religion and any link to it. These restrictions nevertheless must coincide with a teacher’s code of conduct, the anti-religion extremist must understand the difference, and teachers should not have to ignore any moral transgressions by a child. Many parents of young children aged from 4-7 years old, which is when they first start to understand moral and immoral behaviour(2012, 09), can find themselves too busy to instil their own morals and ethics onto their children and rely solely on their child’s other surrounding attributes to provide the developmental avenues necessary. Children who are not taught morals and appropriate behaviour prove to be more disruptive within a class setting (McDevitt, 2013). In these circumstances a child may struggle to develop socially and emotionally. A teacher educating morals will never replace a parent, however if the child is not receiving an ample amount of moral education at home, perhaps it is in the best interest of the parent, teacher and child if they were taught some moral standards at school. An obligated teacher, before enforcing moral standards, must assess a child’s physical, social-emotional and cognitive domains as there is a great diversity within each child’s moral development. Identify family conditions such as family structure, cultural background, family livelihood, parenting styles, disruptive influences and maltreatment (McDevitt, 2013). Gender also plays a role in moral diversity, females are more likely to inherit a care orientation, whilst males are more justice orientated (McDevitt, 2013). Different ethnicities too have varying understandings on what is right, and what is wrong. A child’s exposure to moral disputes and crisis beyond their years will have a great impact on their overall development, in these cases it is applauded for a teacher to feel obliged to not teach, but help a child through a moral issue. Children grow and adapt to their surroundings, they take moral values from all avenues and mould them to coincide within their own lifestyle, and therefore a teacher should feel obliged to contribute a level of moral fortitude, depending on the child’s circumstances. A teacher may encourage morals indirectly by creating learning and social groups for children with a preconventional morality, this enhances their social-emotional development giving the pupil more peers to converse and follow suit (Bredekamp, 2009). A teacher may enforce moral standards cognitively if they believe the child is bullying or acting in a hostile manner. When a child is growing it can be a very fragile process, any altercations to a single progressive domain may throw off the entire balance, as all the developmental domains are similarly linked. Schooling systems are created to assist a child to develop and learn in an environment that appeals to a child’s every growing need, according to the Board of Studies. For an institution to advertise this degree of growth in a child it must have teachers going above and beyond the curriculum to impel children to mature and understand societal transgressions as well as the standard schooling subjects. Children will learn from teachers, teachers are seen as a source of information, they are the hierarchy outside of home, and they are interpreted as unquestionable (Daniels, 2002). If a teacher can use his or hers’ authority, with an educated opinion as to the child’s stability within its three domains, and help children advance their moral standards, then the teacher should welcomely feel obliged to educate morality, without scrutiny. (1,080 words) References Dave Miller. Can’t Teach Morals in School, Scholarly Blog. 2007. D. H. Daniels, L. Shumow. Child development and classroom teaching: a review of the literature and implications for educating teachers, 2002. J. L. Hansen, M. K. Chung, B. B. Avants, K. D. Rudolph, E. A,Shirtcliff, J. C. Gee, R. J. Davidson, S. D. Pollak. Structural variations in prefrontal cortex mediate the relationship between early childhood stress and spatial working memory. Journal of Neuroscience, 2012. Steven D. Schafersman, TEACHING MORALS AND VALUES IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS: A HUMANIST PERSPECTIVE, 1991 S. Bredekamp, C. Copple. Appropreate Practice in Early Childhood Programs, 2009 T. McDevitt, J. Ormrod. Child development: educating and working with children and adolescents (2nd ed), 2004. T. McDevitt, J. Ormrod, G. Cupit, M. Chandler, V. Aloa. Child Development and Education. 2013. 2012, 09. Moral Development. www. StudyMode. com. How to cite Teachers Being Obliged to Teach Morality, Essay examples Teachers Being Obliged to Teach Morality Free Essays Teachers are obliged to develop children’s morality as a part of their education. Children observe and informally learn life skills from an array of sources throughout their lifetime; these influences can affect the physical, cognitive and social-emotional aspects of a child’s development. The standards of a child’s morals are predominantly shaped by the morals of those around them such as peers, adults and teachers; this in many cases can prove undamaging, however some may unintentionally adopt a preconventional morality. We will write a custom essay sample on Teachers Being Obliged to Teach Morality or any similar topic only for you Order Now In order to prevent undesirable moral traits within a child should it be the obligation of their teachers to educate the children in an internal behavioural context? Will this solve the issue? Social theologist’s propose that mental and moral standards have no objective reality, they are derived from ones subjective opinion (Miller, 2007). However it is also argued that a child’s environment is directly linked to changes in the prefrontal cortex of the brain, subsequently affecting the child’s cognitive mental development (Hansen, 2012). Teacher Cadet Essay iframe class="wp-embedded-content" sandbox="allow-scripts" security="restricted" style="position: absolute; clip: rect(1px, 1px, 1px, 1px);" src="https://phdessay.com/teacher-cadet-essay/embed/#?secret=66BopdUt3K" data-secret="66BopdUt3K" width="500" height="282" title="#8220;Teacher Cadet Essay#8221; #8212; Free Essays - PhDessay.com" frameborder="0" marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" scrolling="no"/iframe It can be justified to say that children can and will be affected morally by their surroundings, conversely the degree of impact will be determined by the child’s internal response. The process of moral advancement is linked to an individual’s three developmental domains, physical, cognitive and social-emotional; all of these domains are interrelated among each other and in some way represented within the educational curriculum (McDevitt, 2004). Physical abilities, neurological capabilities and the acquisition of motor skills are all taught and practiced throughout schooling, the obligation teachers have in assisting physical development manifests into an appropriate platform for moral development within the other two domains. Children begin to conceptualise abstract and analytical thought patterns as they learn and follow their teacher’s rules which differ from their social and home rubrics. According to Piaget (1932) children at their earliest stages of moral development begin to analyse behaviours based on the resulting consequences (McDevitt, 2013). Kohlberg’s theory of moral development, where a child’s moral fortitude is defined by what they believe is emotionally right or wrong (McDevitt, 2013), poses as another form of moral evolution. At school, these two forms of moral development arise from teachers whom are individually obligated to teach their students a broad range of moral behaviours and base their teaching on their own moral values; however this creates room for error and discrimination. The obligations some teachers have to educate students on morals is both self-motivated and an honourable attribute, teachers within the public schooling system however have a fine line they must abide by. Religion, is banned in the public school curriculum by the Board of Studies, many people such as Humanists have the perspective that in order to guide children in establishing ‘proper’ morals one must reference a form of religion, whether it be directly or indirectly, however if it creates a happier, healthier child by all means teach moral education in school (Schafersman, 1991). Liberals see the education of morals and ethics to children not as a means of teaching and developing children socially and emotionally, but as a manifestation of religious views (Miller, 2007). This idea is not unfair, many parents have a range of views they predict superior to the idea of religion and any link to it. These restrictions nevertheless must coincide with a teacher’s code of conduct, the anti-religion extremist must understand the difference, and teachers should not have to ignore any moral transgressions by a child. Many parents of young children aged from 4-7 years old, which is when they first start to understand moral and immoral behaviour(2012, 09), can find themselves too busy to instil their own morals and ethics onto their children and rely solely on their child’s other surrounding attributes to provide the developmental avenues necessary. Children who are not taught morals and appropriate behaviour prove to be more disruptive within a class setting (McDevitt, 2013). In these circumstances a child may struggle to develop socially and emotionally. A teacher educating morals will never replace a parent, however if the child is not receiving an ample amount of moral education at home, perhaps it is in the best interest of the parent, teacher and child if they were taught some moral standards at school. An obligated teacher, before enforcing moral standards, must assess a child’s physical, social-emotional and cognitive domains as there is a great diversity within each child’s moral development. Identify family conditions such as family structure, cultural background, family livelihood, parenting styles, disruptive influences and maltreatment (McDevitt, 2013). Gender also plays a role in moral diversity, females are more likely to inherit a care orientation, whilst males are more justice orientated (McDevitt, 2013). Different ethnicities too have varying understandings on what is right, and what is wrong. A child’s exposure to moral disputes and crisis beyond their years will have a great impact on their overall development, in these cases it is applauded for a teacher to feel obliged to not teach, but help a child through a moral issue. Children grow and adapt to their surroundings, they take moral values from all avenues and mould them to coincide within their own lifestyle, and therefore a teacher should feel obliged to contribute a level of moral fortitude, depending on the child’s circumstances. A teacher may encourage morals indirectly by creating learning and social groups for children with a preconventional morality, this enhances their social-emotional development giving the pupil more peers to converse and follow suit (Bredekamp, 2009). A teacher may enforce moral standards cognitively if they believe the child is bullying or acting in a hostile manner. When a child is growing it can be a very fragile process, any altercations to a single progressive domain may throw off the entire balance, as all the developmental domains are similarly linked. Schooling systems are created to assist a child to develop and learn in an environment that appeals to a child’s every growing need, according to the Board of Studies. For an institution to advertise this degree of growth in a child it must have teachers going above and beyond the curriculum to impel children to mature and understand societal transgressions as well as the standard schooling subjects. Children will learn from teachers, teachers are seen as a source of information, they are the hierarchy outside of home, and they are interpreted as unquestionable (Daniels, 2002). If a teacher can use his or hers’ authority, with an educated opinion as to the child’s stability within its three domains, and help children advance their moral standards, then the teacher should welcomely feel obliged to educate morality, without scrutiny. (1,080 words) References Dave Miller. Can’t Teach Morals in School, Scholarly Blog. 2007. D. H. Daniels, L. Shumow. Child development and classroom teaching: a review of the literature and implications for educating teachers, 2002. J. L. Hansen, M. K. Chung, B. B. Avants, K. D. Rudolph, E. A,Shirtcliff, J. C. Gee, R. J. Davidson, S. D. Pollak. Structural variations in prefrontal cortex mediate the relationship between early childhood stress and spatial working memory. Journal of Neuroscience, 2012. Steven D. Schafersman, TEACHING MORALS AND VALUES IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS: A HUMANIST PERSPECTIVE, 1991 S. Bredekamp, C. Copple. Appropreate Practice in Early Childhood Programs, 2009 T. McDevitt, J. Ormrod. Child development: educating and working with children and adolescents (2nd ed), 2004. T. McDevitt, J. Ormrod, G. Cupit, M. Chandler, V. Aloa. Child Development and Education. 2013. 2012, 09. Moral Development. www. StudyMode. com. How to cite Teachers Being Obliged to Teach Morality, Papers

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

One Wild Ride to Glory Essay Example For Students

One Wild Ride to Glory Essay Technically, there are a lot of reasons why I am here. It all started back in the school year of 2011 2012. I was a senior in high school and really dreading being there but I had made the decision when I was a freshman that I wanted to make a career out of playing football. I worked hard all throughout high school taking college advanced classes that I didnt want to take just so I could make it look good on a transcript for when colleges would look at my records. My freshman year of high school was the first time our school had ever had a football program in school history. But there were numerous kids on the team who had played ball at a younger age and knew what the game was about and we had grew up together when we were little ones and throwing the ball in the backyard and knew what it took to win. Under Indiana High School Athletic Association rules when you create a football program you have to compete at the JV level for 2 years. So my freshman year we played 12 games total and we won every single one of them. We were great, everyone in the school was asking why we hadnt have had a program before because we were so successful. Our talent raised eyebrows and made people think. While the season came to a close we were all very appreciative that the school give us a chance to play. Fast forwarding a bit through one semester and then to the summer. I vigorously worked my ass off by waking up early at 6 in the morning to go to practice by 7:30 in the morning. I would be practicing for 3 to 4 hours every day almost and then going out and working in the hot fields of the summer baling hay. I didnt live like most the kids, growing up in a small town of roughly 1,200 people we all were different. Some kids stayed in played video games but there were numerous ones of us that lives on farms help their families the whole summer. But I always wanted to do more, I was always super busy bouncing back and forth between football practice, working on the farm shoveling out the stalls, running a tractor, mowing yards for local real estate businesses, and even working for an auctioneer company. I was always well respected for being such a young man and being a vigorously hard worker. Since my mom owns her own business I was always expected to help her in my down time though I didnt have much. I always told my parents growing up that I wanted to be somebody, and I knew football would help me find the inner me. Its just Who I am, its just something that I can do and be happy and once I put on my cleats and strep but my helmet Im just in my own place and ready to go to battle. Though we were told after practice to keep our helmets and pads in our lockers, I would take mine home and practice by myself. I would set up a little obstacle course in my backyard with tractor tires and 55 gallon metal drums that I used as people. I would do this to make myself better, I always wanted to be the best of the best. I would do this every summer it was eat sleep and repeat kind of thing. Fast forwarding to my sophomore year it was the same thing. We were a JV program with freshman, sophomore, juniors, and seniors all on a junior varsity program. We won every single game. We were really great. We had people talking about us saying that they need to watch out for a program once we became a varsity team. But skipping ahead throughout the whole year and to the next season there was a lot to prepare for. It was going to be our first year ever competing at the varsity program level, our team was full of freshman, sophomore, juniors, and seniors. Jeff Bezos EssayThe feeling was crazy and felt like no other. We went right back to practice the next week and prepared for our next game and went throughout the season fighting through games but finished my senior year with a three and seven record. After the season had concluded I thought long and hard about what I wanted to do, I had received many offers to go play at the division 3 level and a couple division 2 but I decided against going to school. I had my heart set on joining the army and making a career out of it. It came time for graduation and I was very happy that I was going to be leaving school and starting my career so soon. Three weeks after graduation I was scheduled to leave for boot camp, but on a hot summer day God had another plan for me instead. I was out riding my crotch rocket down Indiana State Road 1 when a semi passed me and the wind sent me and my bike directly into the side ditch and caused me to wreck. Luckily I was out riding with a friend and they saw the wreck and they stopped to help me immediately, they called 911 and not too long shortly after an ambulance showed up. They told me to stay calm and gave me some medicine on the spot and transported me to the local hospital. After getting to the hospital and taking some xrays they found that my shoulder was broke and my clavicle was broke in two spots and would need surgery. I was devastated at this point learning of my injury and I only could think what was going to happen to my future. After I was released from the hospital I immediately got in contact with my recruiter and discussed the situation, he told me that they would put me on hold for shipment and to just focus on rehabilitation. So months go by and I work my ass off to get my shoulder strength back up to where I thought it was. I finally get cleared by the doctor for physical activities. So I give the recruiter a call and he asked me to bring in x-ray documentation and paperwork stating what exactly happened during my rehabilitation and all of my surgeries. He sent the paperwork out to get looked at and after 2 weeks of not hearing anything they finally get back with me and I get my dreams shattered they told me that I was no longer able to be enlisted in the army because of my injury, there was no ands ifs or buts about it, it wasnt going to ever happen they said. So I thought long and hard about what I wanted to do and I just kept putting myself down thinking I wasnt ever going to be anything, I went back and spoke to the doctor about my shoulder and he told me that it was in my best interest to never play a contact sport again but football had been all I knew and I wasnt going to let anything stop me from playing it again. So I set out on a journey sending out game film to many Midwest schools partially not too far from home. I put numerous miles on my car driving to Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia, Ohio, and Michigan for college visits. I really wasnt sure where I wanted to go I looked at numerous schools, from big to small, from the University of Tennessee, to Marshall University, to Ohio Bobcats, and then I accidentally ran across Adrian College on the Internet. Coming from a small town called Farmland, Indiana all I had ever known was small, being only 20 miles east of Muncie and Ball State University I didnt want to stay home and attend the school. So after 3 years of being out of school and graduating in June of 2012, I finally made the decision to not listen to the doctor and actually play the sport I had always loved, and that is what got me here!

Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Observation technique free essay sample

Checklists are lists of specific traits or behaviors arranged in logical order Check lists are especially useful for types of behavior or traits than can be easily and clearly specified Information from anecdotal and running records can be transferred to checklists to make interpretation easier Advantages 1. They are easy and quick to use; 2. Little training required; 3. They can be used in the presence of the child or recorded later; 4. Helps to focus observations on many behaviors at once; 5. Can be used for curriculum planning; activities can be planned to encourage certain behaviors that have not yet been observed; 6. Can be used to condense information from running record or anecdotal records. Disadvantages 1. Not very detailed; 2. Little information about the context or sequence of events; 3. May miss important information not included on the checklist. 4. Notes if a behavior occurred but not how often it occurs or the duration of the behavior. Something that happens once may not be very meaningful. We will write a custom essay sample on Observation technique or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page Target child observation This form of observation is used in group settings to find out whether children are getting worthwhile experiences in the group. The child may be selected for a particular reason or at random. The child is observed for a concentrated period of time noting: ? The language they use ? How they interact with others ? What they are doing ? What materials they are using Particular attention should be paid to whether the child is being challenged by activities that make them think, work things out and whether they concentrate on activities. To gain an accurate picture of a child’s development at a given time it is advisable to complete observations over a few days or a week. The observer must bear in mind that one isolated observation, even though it may reveal a surprising amount of information about a particular child, should never form the basis for reaching conclusions about a child’s ongoing development. If the practitioner wishes to get a full picture, they will need to collect a series of observations made at regular intervals over a period of time. Checklist Observation A guide used for assessing a child on a particular day against a list of specific milestonesthat should be reached at a certain time. Checklists can be used on all children on aregular basis to enable you to plan for each child’s needs. Advantages †¢ It is quick and simple to use. †¢ It is a fast way of presenting a great deal of information. †¢ It can be used as part of a Longitudinal study. †¢ It can be regularly repeated to assess developmental progress. †¢ Parents/carers can use it. †¢ The guide can also be used on a group of children to find out more detail about thegroup.  e. g. Gender differences-or show that there are none. Disadvantages †¢ It may allow you narrow and limited information. †¢ The checklist may not give a true picture on the day if the child is upset or unwell. †¢ It may be tempting to put a tick against a skill you think a child has achievedtherefore you are not being objective and may disadvantage the chil d. Focus /Target Child Focus/target child is the observation of a particular child for a specific amount of time. Pre-coded categories are used to record what is being observed this technique is a good wayof collecting data. Advantages †¢ Focus/target one child, providing a collection of precise data over a period of time. †¢ Information and data are easily accessible. †¢ Demonstrates areas mostly used by the child in the setting. †¢ Shows which area promotes conversation. Disadvantages †¢ Information and data are limited. †¢ More interesting information may be obtained but left out. †¢ Codes have to be learnt by the observer, †¢ The observer needs to focus on one particular child. †¢ The observer needs to develop the skill to summarise precisely.

Saturday, March 7, 2020

How To Become a Dermatologist

How To Become a Dermatologist So you want to be a dermatologist. That’s great! Dermatologists are so much more than just the doctors you turn to for acne treatment. They can save lives, bring relief to patients suffering with chronic and uncomfortable conditions, treat rashes and infections, and do a million other things- including skin cancer prevention, education, and treatment. Dermatologists have a range of duties on a daily basis which are as diverse as their patients’ needs. They can work in a hospital setting, a clinical private practice setting, or in a more academic environment. And they can usually get their patient care for a given week accomplished in 30-40 hours, which is less than many other medical fields.Dermatologists make an average of over $300k per year, with some making as much as $385k. It is the third highest paying of the physician specialties. Given that the demand for physicians in general is expected to grow 18% in the next decade or so, it’s a safe bet that dermato logy will continue to be a good field to enter.Required EducationDermatology is one of the most competitive fields out there. Start by getting the best grades you can, and don’t stop until you’re finished school completely. You’ll need a four-year medical degree plus the completion of a three-year residency program in dermatology, which will include board-certification and licensing. The first step in this process is obviously a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution. Then, just keep working your way through, making sure to perform as well as possible. The better you do, the better position you’ll be in to get a job when you get out of school.No matter what, you’ll have to deal with the USMLE and/or COMLEX exams. Study hard. Once you get to the residency stage, you can decide what you want your practice to look like, and whether you would like to sub-specialize in either Dermatopathology, Pediatric Dermatology, or Procedural Dermat ology. (Subspecialties will typically require an additional exam).Possible Career PathsMost dermatologists work in outpatient settings, though some do work as a team with hospital surgeons, completing rounds, or making emergency assessments. You’ll probably spend the bulk of your time in your own clinical setting.You might wish to consider joining a professional organization to aid with networking, community service, furthering your research, and continuing education/training. Consider joining the American Academy of Dermatology, American Dermatological Association, or the American Society of Dermatology as a start.Start Early!If you’re serious about becoming a dermatologist and you are still in college, take advantage of your summers off to intern or volunteer. Remember this is an incredibly competitive field, so anything you can do to get ahead is good.

Thursday, February 20, 2020

HSTORY AND THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

HSTORY AND THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION - Essay Example As a consequence they were in desperate need to pay their debts, for which they levied a variety of taxes. The so-called Navigation Acts were perhaps the first decision of the British Parliament to be received coldly by the American Colonials. These acts, technically several of them, dated back to the 1650’s and sought to mandate that all traded goods coming from the European continent and headed for the American Colonies must first pass through Great Britain so as to ensure that British merchants would benefit from the trade. They had for decades been ignored by the Americans who, in violation of these acts, simply traded as they wished (Beard 1944, p. 91). With the ruinous debt Britain faced after 1763, the Crown sought to pay that debt by taxing the colonies. If the acts had been applied uniformly to all subjects of the British Empire, then perhaps the Americans would not have been bothered by them. The opposite was the case. â€Å"The ‘main material part’ of the Navigation Acts [was] acceptable†¦Americans were not opposed to regulations of their general commerce by Parliament, ‘providing such regulations were bona fide for the benefit of the whole Empire, not for the small advantage of one part to the great injury of another’† (Doren 1938, p. 490). That was the background. The Molasses Act of 1733 had sought to tax molasses made in the French West Indies to the benefit of the more expensive British-made variety. The Americans, many of whom themselves shipped in the illegal molasses, openly refused to obey the 1733 legislation. In 1764 Parliament passed the Sugar Act, which â€Å"reflected a shrewd effort by the ministry to balance American and British interests† (Henretta 2000, p. 149). The speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives argued that the duties on sugar constituted a tax, so that the Sugar Act was ‘contrary to a fundamental Principall of our Constitution: That all Taxes ought